Digital Research Symposium

Digital Research Symposium
featuring Graduate and Undergraduate Digital Research

This event will showcase the independent, digital research and classroom work of undergraduate students alongside the innovative research and project development of faculty and graduate students. Join us as for a digital poster session from 10-11. 

PLEASE NOTE - THE PROGRAMMING FOR THIS EVENT HAS CHANGED.  THIS YEAR'S SYMPOSIUM WILL CONSIST ONLY OF THE 1 HOUR DIGITAL POSTER SESSION FROM 10-12.

Light refreshments will be provided.

UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH + COURSE WORK 

We invite all undergraduate students engaged in creative, critical research using digital tools and platforms to submit proposals for a Digital Poster Session. As part of the larger symposium, the Digital Poster Session provides an opportunity for students to display their work and invite one-on-one conversation without a formal presentation.  The Digital Poster Sessions allows students to highlight the interactivity of their work by presenting live digital projects and we encourage you to submit live projects or project prototypes when possible.   

 

DIGITAL POSTER SESSION PARTICIPANTS:

Mythikmusic
Presented By: Mythili

Mythikmusic is my YouTube channel that I was able to start thanks to the audio equipment and electric keyboard provided by the DSC. I post original music, as well as song covers on this channel.

 

Squish
Presented By: Reed Scriven
Project Team:

A competitive couch coop game where players push falling blocks to be the last one standing

 

Turtleback Tombs, Paper Cranes, Memorials and Eisa: Modern Contextualizations of Death in Okinawa
Presented By: Nirupama Chandrasekhar

This research project will explore collective approaches towards death on Okinawa, by examining the way that death ceremonies, memorials and celebration intertwine on the island. There is a stark contrast between the joyful celebration of Obon, the Okinawa ceremony for welcoming the spirits of the dead back to the house in celebration of the lives of past-loved-ones, and the collective anger, repression and trauma about the death caused during World War Two and the American Occupation. In exploring the ways that public and private mourning coincide and contrast, this research project aims to try and understand how the two dynamics exist in the physical landscape of Okinawa. This project uses a lot of digital media, such as mapping, videos, images and audio, in order to further highlight the many ways in which Okinawa is marked by death, beyond what a simple research paper could capture.

 

Virtual Reconstruction of the Tomb of Psamtek
Presented by: Savannah Dawson
Project Team: Elaine Sullivan, Reed Scriven, Chris Cain

Our project is a 3D reconstruction of an ancient Egyptian tomb that belonged to an elite individual named Psamtek. It is a collaboration with a team at UC Berkeley that involved interpreting primary sources, recreating the tomb in Blender (3D building program), and preparing the tomb for virtual reality in Unity (game building program). By making a historic space available in VR, we are able to revive the space itself and allow people to become closer to the ancient world. In doing so, we can restore narratives of those who lived in the far past in an immersive way.

 

Wacktory
Presented by:
Project Team: Talon Baker, Dustin Halsey, Salvador Galindo, Josh Clouse, Jeremy Lafond, Zack Lawrence, Reed Scriven, Sandra Tiu Latt, Nichole Wilkinson,Terence So, Herman Wu, and Taylor Reyland

Wacktory™ is a new take on cooperative gameplay that pushes the limits of both Virtual Reality and traditional couch co-op where players work together to beat the clock and create the most advanced product ever seen — The Cube.

Friday, May 24 at 10:00am to 11:00am


Digital Scholarship Commons, McHenry Library

Event Type

Lectures & Presentations

Website

https://calendar.library.ucsc.edu/eve...

Group
Library, University
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